"Salivary Gland Infections" and Plasma Fibroblast

 It can be quite distressing when a client contacts you complaining about swollen glands following Plasma Fibroblast treatment.

CASE STUDY Q&A

Salivary gland infections and plasma fibroblast, Salivary gland infections affect the glands that produce spit (saliva).

There are 3 pairs of major salivary glands:

  • Parotid glands -- These are the two largest glands. One is located in each cheek over the jaw in front of the ears. Inflammation of one or more of these glands is called parotitis, or parotiditis.
  • Submandibular glands -- These two glands are located just under both sides of the lower jaw and carry saliva up to the floor of the mouth under the tongue.
  • Sublingual glands -- These two glands are located just under the front most area of the floor of the mouth.

All of the salivary gland’s empty saliva into the mouth. The saliva enters the mouth through ducts that open into the mouth in different places.

Case Presentation

  • F&E anesthesia cream was used to treat a 53-year-old female with Plasma Fibroblast.
  • Her physical condition was good; she is a smoker who stopped drinking alcoholic beverages a year and a half ago.
  • Her medical history was insignificant; she had no known allergic history.
  • The client had partial areas of her face treated with plasma fibroblast in one sitting- including her eyes, a neck lift, + sebaceous hyperplasia, and age spot removal.
  • The duration of treatment has been 4 1/2 hours, including numbing time.

Question

On the third day following plasma fibroblast treatment, the client expressed concern about swelling just beneath her ears and inquired whether the plasma fibroblast treatment could be the cause of the swelling glands.

Swelling glands


Answer

Plasma uses a controlled electrical arc and is discharged from the device without touching the skin. This discharge causes micro trauma to the top layer of the skin, prompting the skin to contract, The fibroblast activates new collagen and elastin formation helping the skin to regenerate, maintaining skin firmness and tightness, and does not penetrate the deeper layers of the skin, and therefore could not be the cause of the clients swelling glands (see image)

Possible causes:

  • Topical Anesthetic Numbing Cream is generally accepted that the effect on the immune system is modest, thus, a topical anesthetic may not have any clinically significant effects on immune function in healthy patients
  • The head placement during the long procedures may be a possible cause for the swelling glands, after long procedures in the decubitus supine position, (lying flat) compressive pressure blocking Stensen's duct may cause obstructive acute transitory sialadenopathy
Salivary glands

I assured this particular client that applying the plasma fibroblast technique could not be the cause of her swelling glands and explained that it could be due to the prolonged time lying in the same position during treatment (even though we did take breaks every hour for + - 5 minutes in between treatments) and advised her to consult with her health provider to confirm
this.
Salivary gland infections are somewhat common

Parotid gland



  • Bacterial infections are most often the result of:Blockage from salivary duct stones
  • Poor cleanliness in the mouth (oral hygiene
  • Low amounts of water in the body
  • Smoking
  • Chronic illness
  • Autoimmune diseases
  • Symptoms May include:
  • Swelling of the face (particularly in front of the ears, below the jaw, or on the floor of the mouth)
  • Abnormal tastes, foul tastes
  • Decreased ability to open the mouth
  • Dry mouth
  • Fever
  • Mouth or facial "squeezing" pain, especially when eating
  • Redness over the side of the face or the upper neck

Exams and Tests The client’s healthcare provider or dentist can do an exam to look for enlarged glands.

  • The client may also have pus that drains into the mouth. The gland is often painful.
  • A CT scan, MRI scan, or ultrasound may be done if the provider suspects an abscess, or to look for stones.
  • The client’s provider may suggest a mumps blood test if multiple glands are involved.
  • A bacterial culture can help identify the organism causing the problem.
  • TreatmentIn some cases, no treatment is needed.

Treatment from the client’s provider may include:

  • Antibiotics if the client has a fever or pus drainage, or if the infection is caused by bacteria. Antibiotics are not useful against viral infections.
  • Surgery or aspiration to drain an abscess if the client has one.
A new technique, called sialendoscopy, uses a very small camera and instruments to diagnose and treat infections and other problems in the salivary glands.


Self-care steps the client can take at home to help with recovery include

  • Practice good oral hygiene. Brush their teeth and floss well at least twice a day. This may help with healing and prevent an infection from spreading.
  • Rinse their mouth with warm salt water (one-half teaspoon or 3 grams of salt in 1 cup or 240 milliliters of water) to ease pain and keep the mouth moist.

To speed up healing

  • To stop smoking if the client is a smoker.
  • Drink lots of water and use sugar-free lemon drops to increase the flow of saliva and reduce swelling.
  • Massaging the gland with heat.
  • Using warm compresses on the inflamed gland.
  • Outlook (Prognosis)Most salivary gland infections go away on their own or are cured with treatment. Some infections will return. Complications are not common.

Possible ComplicationsMay include:

  • Abscess of the salivary gland
  • Return of infection
  • Spread of infection (cellulitis, Ludwig angina)
  • When to Contact a Medical ProfessionalIf the symptoms get worse
  • Clients to get medical help right away if they have: High fever
  • Trouble breathing
  • Swallowing problems

Conclusion

You could assure your client that Plasma Fibroblast treatment itself could not be the cause of swelling of the glands but the long period of lying in the same position during the treatment could have promoted this, and there are no long-term repercussions from this swelling, which will go down on its own over the course of a few hours or days and ask them to visit their health provider to confirm if this is the case.

It is always preferable to advise your client to have smaller areas treated with plasma fibroblast in one sitting (the healing is normally less traumatic), but as we all know, not all clients have the time or patience to come in for multiple treatments.

Here is an intro you can watch on Youtube

ebook 6

Very easy to use! With a single click on the topic in the "Table of contents" page, you will be taken to the specific page you require training or answers.

Unfortunately, the e-book training manual currently is only available in English. You have the option to upload the PDF document into your Google docs and translate the e-book to your language of preference,

Buy it here: My Shop

“Plasma Fibroblast Technicians"

You are welcome to go and download my FREE e-book 1, also a valuable educational handout for your clients, Considering Plasma Fibroblast Skin tightening. "All You Need to Know" the 1st intro to my ebook 6.

There are also a lot of FREE professional documents and posters for Plasma Fibroblast, ie: e-mail templates, info to your client, sample of price list, aftercare, confirmation letter, consent form, and much more which you can download for FREE just put a zero in the price fields

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Happy Plasma!

Susan 

ROSASS ❤